Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 52

Thread: Martin No 38 (D9, Freehold, SC Global)

  1. #1
    mr funny is offline Any complaints please PM me
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    8,129

    Default Martin No 38 (D9, Freehold, SC Global)

    http://www.businesstimes.com.sg/sub/...92016,00.html?

    Published August 13, 2008

    SC Global to launch Martin No38

    By ARTHUR SIM


    SC GLOBAL will launch Martin No 38 next month at an average price close to $2,000 per square foot.


    Sleek beauty: Artist's impression of the development, designed by award-winning architect Kerry Hill. It will launch at an average price close to $2,000 psf.

    The company said in a statement yesterday that the 91-unit development in Martin Road, near Mohammed Sultan Road and Clarke Quay, will mostly comprise one-plus-one bedroom and two-bedroom apartments ranging from 969-1,130 sq ft. There will be a limited number of larger two-plus-one and three-bedroom apartments, ranging from 1,335-1,485 sq ft.

    Knight Frank director (research and consultancy) Nicholas Mak said the pricing appears a little 'bullish' but the developer may feel the project's 'design' merits this.

    A unit in nearby Robertson Blue sold recently for around $1,800 psf, he said.

    And in March, it was reported that about 30 units at Martin Place Residences in Kim Yam Road sold for an average price of of about $1,800 psf after discounts.

    SC Global is best known for developing high-end niche projects. And according to its chairman and chief executive officer Simon Cheong: 'There is always room for the right product. Martin No 38, with the SC Global reputation for quality, will be unique and original. We are confident it will be well received.'

    The development is designed by award-winning architect Kerry Hill. It is based on warehouse lofts in New York and London and features high ceilings and seamless interior spaces.

    SC Global says: 'An austere and beguiling industrial aestheticism pervades the details of this development, from the blackened tap fittings to the sheet-metal panels in the bathrooms, with their exposed bolt heads, unplastered interior concrete walls, exposed plywood edges of the cabinetry and acres of unvarnished timber.'

    SC Global bought the site in 1999 but deferred development until the area had 'rejuvenated itself and the context for this housing concept became ripe'.

    SC Global projects under construction include The Marq on Paterson Hill and Hilltops at Cairnhill. The group has a landbank of more than 1.1 million sq ft of gross floor area in the Orchard Road and at Sentosa Cove.

  2. #2
    mr funny is offline Any complaints please PM me
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    8,129

    Default

    http://www.straitstimes.com/Money/St...ry_267397.html

    August 13, 2008 Wednesday

    SC Global offers NY-warehouse living at Martin Rd


    The warehouse flats will boast a more rugged design. -- SC GLOBAL

    SC GLOBAL is introducing New York-style warehouse living to Martin Road - a first for Singapore - with prices that will be set above the market average.

    Like warehouse lofts in Lower Manhattan, the flats will feature high ceilings and seamless interior spaces that can be separated at will, using walls that slide and hide away.

    And unlike traditional high-end developments here, Martin No. 38, as the project is called, will have a more rugged design of raw concrete, base metal finishes and unvarnished timbers.

    Australian architect Kerry Hill is designing the project, which is on the site of a former warehouse near the Singapore River.

    The freehold development, which will be launched later this year, will be 15 storeys high with 91 units, including four penthouses with pools.

    Most of the units will be small - from 969 to 1,130 sq ft each - but there will be some larger ones of 1,335 to 1,495 sq ft each.

    SC Global is aiming to sell the units at an average of $2,000 per sq ft (psf).

    Prices of projects in the same area are around $1,200 to $1,850 psf, according to Knight Frank. Newer projects like 8 Rodyk cost more - a 721 sq ft apartment sold at $1,800 psf last month.

    But market sentiment remains weak, with buyers staying away, especially from the high-end sector, which surged dramatically last year.

    Prices have since slipped while activity has slowed considerably. But there is always room for the right product, said SC Global chairman and chief executive Simon Cheong, who is confident Martin No. 38 will be well-received.

    SC Global bought the site in 1999 but said it deferred development until the area was rejuvenated and the concept of warehouse lofts became viable.

    JOYCE TEO

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    62

    Default WTF

    Wow. This is why management are paid lots of money and the end users end up getting shit. Don't they know that recession is already here?

    Japan - in recession.
    US - in recession.
    EU - in recession.
    SG - in technical recession.

    C'mon $2K psf? Even if it is very nicely designed, ppl will just pay $1.3K psf and stay at Parc Emily instead. And they can move in NOW.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    37

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oxboy99
    Wow. This is why management are paid lots of money and the end users end up getting shit. Don't they know that recession is already here?

    Japan - in recession.
    US - in recession.
    EU - in recession.
    SG - in technical recession.

    C'mon $2K psf? Even if it is very nicely designed, ppl will just pay $1.3K psf and stay at Parc Emily instead. And they can move in NOW.

    hello oxboy, what u think of nomu? thx.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    263

    Default

    nice project

  6. #6
    parc emily is crap lah Guest

    Default

    parc emily is a crap development, dont bring it into the picture. it is a low class development in the lousiest part of D9. Lousy facing and lousy interior, short buildings and shitty surroundings. Even the HDB flats a short walk away from parc emily is much better.

    Quote Originally Posted by oxboy99
    Wow. This is why management are paid lots of money and the end users end up getting shit. Don't they know that recession is already here?

    Japan - in recession.
    US - in recession.
    EU - in recession.
    SG - in technical recession.

    C'mon $2K psf? Even if it is very nicely designed, ppl will just pay $1.3K psf and stay at Parc Emily instead. And they can move in NOW.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    6

    Default Nomu rocks

    I would also be keen on having (do i need to say) constructive feedback on Nomu, for this i would encourage anyone to do so on the Nomu thread that s been created under the district 9 folder.
    Cheers.

  8. #8
    NOMU=NOT OF MUCH USE Guest

    Default

    NOMU=NOT OF MUCH USE condo.
    Quote Originally Posted by condowner
    I would also be keen on having (do i need to say) constructive feedback on Nomu, for this i would encourage anyone to do so on the Nomu thread that s been created under the district 9 folder.
    Cheers.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    62

    Default NOMU

    Also priced at $2K psf from the paper same as Martin No. 38 and you can move in immediately and close to Plaza Sing and Dhoby Ghout.

    But it's 99 year leasehold right? Looks small and cramped from outside. Out of my budget but I can sneak a look and post my findings.

  10. #10
    2kpsf 4 designer wrehse Guest

    Default

    no way payng 2kpsf 4 designer warehouse

  11. #11
    The urbanite Guest

    Default The Lincoln Modern

    These kinds of properties are not for the masses. Only the discerning will buy. SC global is also only targeting the discrening, well heeled. Closest comparison is not Parc Emily or the likes. Closest comparison is The Lincoln Modern which is less dear than this property, and still from SC global.

    I have a unit there for sale, anyone interested call me 98247062. Just 1400 psf.

  12. #12
    thinker Guest

    Default

    a discerning developer would never locate a warehouse styled condo in a district with many condos that exude elegance. A gd example of condo n locatn mismatch is the linear at upper bt timah wth nice linear architecture n french windows facing a filthy industrial road and stuck to a row of shophouses n ugly coffeeshop. Martin 38 is the opposite, a style not befittng of locatn. Strikes me as just wanting to be loud with no other aesthetic purpose. Would u still say developer is discerning?
    Quote Originally Posted by The urbanite
    These kinds of properties are not for the masses. Only the discerning will buy. SC global is also only targeting the discrening, well heeled. Closest comparison is not Parc Emily or the likes. Closest comparison is The Lincoln Modern which is less dear than this property, and still from SC global.

    I have a unit there for sale, anyone interested call me 98247062. Just 1400 psf.

  13. #13
    Kruger Guest

    Default

    I agree with Urbanite. It is quite unique, this warehouse concept. Not everyone will like it though. It is for the rich one that appreciates the style.


    Ce n'est pas tant d'Ítre riche qui fait le bonheur, c'est de le devenir - Stendhal

  14. #14
    Unreg.istered Guest

    Default

    i do not understand it when u say warehouse design is for the rich. I knw some rich people running big businesses in the manufacturing industry who use warehouses to store their goods or exports. Would they want to live in places with resemblence to their warehouses? Rich people generally like to live in places that are soft to the eyes to break away frm the concrete around. Such industrial design seems to suit the young yuppie class more than the CEO or chairman of an MNC.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kruger
    I agree with Urbanite. It is quite unique, this warehouse concept. Not everyone will like for the rich one that appreciates the style.


    Ce n'est pas tant d'Ítre riche qui fait le bonheur, c'est de le devenir - Stendhal

  15. #15
    Kruger Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Unreg.istered
    i do not understand it when u say warehouse design is for the rich. I knw some rich people running big businesses in the manufacturing industry who use warehouses to store their goods or exports. Would they want to live in places with resemblence to their warehouses? Rich people generally like to live in places that are soft to the eyes to break away frm the concrete around. Such industrial design seems to suit the young yuppie class more than the CEO or chairman of an MNC.
    I meant that you need money as well as a taste for this sort of housing. I don't expect an MNC geek to stay here. Nor would I expect a broke artist.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    D15
    Posts
    5,095

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kruger
    I meant that you need money as well as a taste for this sort of housing. I don't expect an MNC geek to stay here. Nor would I expect a broke artist.
    Forgive them, these people haven't seen how the discerning modern and fashionable rich lives in New York or London. They aren't aware even that the rich with net assets of US$5million just crossed the million mark.

  17. #17
    rich taste or distaste? Guest

    Default

    from what u say, i take it that rich londoners and new yorkers either have a fetish for industrial design or have never in their lives associated with the low class working environmt so they think it is novel. Are these designs meant to bridge the gap between factory class and the rich? Does it want to provoke such a feeling frm smeone walking past: "wow, how did a warehouse or factory become a residential building?" or "how odd, a factory building in a prime residential district?"
    Quote Originally Posted by blackjack21trader
    Forgive them, these people haven't seen how the discerning modern and fashionable rich lives in New York or London. They aren't aware even that the rich with net assets of US$5million just crossed the million mark.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    D15
    Posts
    5,095

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rich taste or distaste?
    from what u say, i take it that rich londoners and new yorkers either have a fetish for industrial design or have never in their lives associated with the low class working environmt so they think it is novel. Are these designs meant to bridge the gap between factory class and the rich? Does it want to provoke such a feeling frm smeone walking past: "wow, how did a warehouse or factory become a residential building?" or "how odd, a factory building in a prime residential district?"
    You don't get it, do you? Read this:

    ======================================================
    Comments On a New York loft:

    Kate said... Great photo: composition, textures, colours, and very good info. I like the way you framed it. I checked the link, and thank you for letting me view that wonderful loft condo. It would be great to live there, wouldn't it??
    Thursday, November 16, 2006 11:17:00 AM Brian said... These large industrial buildings, typical of areas like SOHO or DUMBO, have wonderful spaces ith many of the features we find in prewar high rises - larger spaces, higher ceilings, better sound insulation etc.
    Brian
    Thursday, November 16, 2006 8:16:00 PM w said... Such massive wall yet looks feather light because of the curves. Love the name of the company...bold, proud and no nonsense. Wonderful photo!
    Friday, November 17, 2006 8:34:00 AM Eric said... Love it! Absolutely love it! The colours, the architecture, the font of the text! LOL
    Saturday, November 18, 2006 3:13:00 AM Eric said... I just came back to see this photo again and can't believe there aren't more comments on it. I still love it!
    Sunday, November 26, 2006 1:25:00 PM =========================================

  19. #19
    Unregistere.d Guest

    Default

    these are comments of just 5 people, so? suppose it is just individual taste, but as a singaporean, i just hope the building won't spoil the facade of the area...

    Quote Originally Posted by blackjack21trader
    You don't get it, do you? Read this:

    ======================================================
    Comments On a New York loft:

    Kate said... Great photo: composition, textures, colours, and very good info. I like the way you framed it. I checked the link, and thank you for letting me view that wonderful loft condo. It would be great to live there, wouldn't it??
    Thursday, November 16, 2006 11:17:00 AM Brian said... These large industrial buildings, typical of areas like SOHO or DUMBO, have wonderful spaces ith many of the features we find in prewar high rises - larger spaces, higher ceilings, better sound insulation etc.
    Brian
    Thursday, November 16, 2006 8:16:00 PM w said... Such massive wall yet looks feather light because of the curves. Love the name of the company...bold, proud and no nonsense. Wonderful photo!
    Friday, November 17, 2006 8:34:00 AM Eric said... Love it! Absolutely love it! The colours, the architecture, the font of the text! LOL
    Saturday, November 18, 2006 3:13:00 AM Eric said... I just came back to see this photo again and can't believe there aren't more comments on it. I still love it!
    Sunday, November 26, 2006 1:25:00 PM =========================================

  20. #20
    Hanging gardens Guest

    Default

    Industrial design? Why? Don't we have enough concrete and skyscrapers? I think a real novel idea is to incorporate designs of true iconic places like the hanging gardens of babylon or the temple of Zeus in our modern day architecture, not some silly looking warehouse like building. I am aware of the modern industrial design catching up, but very son, people will get sick of it and it would fade away as just another concrete block in the area without any lasting significance.

  21. #21
    hanging gardens Guest

    Lightbulb

    the avant garde of our times don't last very long. only true and classical works of art prevail and last over time. Why don't any local architect and developer see it?

  22. #22
    obiang to the max Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hanging gardens
    Industrial design? Why? Don't we have enough concrete and skyscrapers? I think a real novel idea is to incorporate designs of true iconic places like the hanging gardens of babylon or the temple of Zeus in our modern day architecture, not some silly looking warehouse like building. I am aware of the modern industrial design catching up, but very son, people will get sick of it and it would fade away as just another concrete block in the area without any lasting significance.

    The Roman and Greek design is soooooooo obiang and passe! It is usually the taste of Indonesia, China and HK towkays. So gross! Marble everywhere, little boy peeing statues everywhere, it matches very well with the thick gold chains, big branded logos and the diamond studded rolex that these no class richies wear. Wah lau! You know very well that these kind of buyers have never been SC Global's target market.

    These kind of buyers are more the Wing Tai and Cheung Kong market.

    Super obiang ah!

  23. #23
    gross lah Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hanging gardens
    the avant garde of our times don't last very long. only true and classical works of art prevail and last over time. Why don't any local architect and developer see it?
    Bullshit. Last year, the "splendour" interior design was all the rage - you know, the modern floral designs everywhere, on chandeliers, etc - now it just looks super passe. I pity those homeowners who did up their houses like that. It was trendy the past couple of years. Now it is just so dated.

    You want to know what stands the test of time? Philip Starck, Patricia Urquiola, and the rest of the Euro designers. Not some bloody "avant garde" floral patterns!

    Last week I justwent to a friend's HDB and he had the same modern floral patterns wallpaper, etc. Yuck! Open any local interior design magazine and you see that same shit in every ID'd flat. Please lah. SC Global is better than that.

    You want that kind of cheesy Babylonian shit and little boy statues, go buy obiang condos like Aspen Heights, Pebble Bay, instead. EEEE-YER!

  24. #24
    Martin area Guest

    Default

    The condos here mostly look like shit.

    The only nice one here is Robertson Blue. That is what I call class.

    Second maybe Rivergate. After that is Inspira, which is quite a common blah design. Followed by Watermark, which tries to be different but ends up looking like an office building.

    The worst one has to be Robertson 100 (looks like Geylang condo), followed by the Quayside, followed by the Pier, which looks like a very strange crossbreed between modern edgy design and classical rounded towers. Dunno why CDL's architect insists on this style, same like Parc Emily.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    D15
    Posts
    5,095

    Default

    Industrial design does not mean it is going to look like a warehouse. To put it according to my own understanding, the industrial elements are tastefully integrated into the design of the apartment which make it look extremely pleasing and artistic. It feel very special to live in such a space as you can have unpartitioned whole floor, or moveable walls, etc... Not a new concept in major cities of the world- the term industrial design has been very hip for the western urban rich many years overseas.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    D15
    Posts
    5,095

    Default

    Some examples of "industrial design" elements:


    Kitchen constructed of industrial materials.



    Industrial wire for the railings of staircase



    No walls to partition ! Just open spaces.


    2 levels in one floor



    Exposed pipes on ceilings.

  27. #27
    greek Guest

    Default

    nobody has yet integrated hanging gardens of babylon into any design and egytian n greek designs are timeless. They have been around have been around for thousands of years and still acceptable today. It is passe to make way for other temporary avant design but will soon come back. Even minimalist design has more taste than raw industrial design. What we really need are a few Gaudi architectures in our landscape to really make a difference. Most condos n avant garde designs lack timelessness. Sure u get what i mean..
    Quote Originally Posted by gross lah
    Bullshit. Last year, the "splendour" interior design was all the rage - you know, the modern floral designs everywhere, on chandeliers, etc - now it just looks super passe. I pity those homeowners who did up their houses like that. It was trendy the past couple of years. Now it is just so dated.

    You want to know what stands the test of time? Philip Starck, Patricia Urquiola, and the rest of the Euro designers. Not some bloody "avant garde" floral patterns!

    Last week I justwent to a friend's HDB and he had the same modern floral patterns wallpaper, etc. Yuck! Open any local interior design magazine and you see that same shit in every ID'd flat. Please lah. SC Global is better than that.

    You want that kind of cheesy Babylonian shit and little boy statues, go buy obiang condos like Aspen Heights, Pebble Bay, instead. EEEE-YER!

  28. #28
    art nouveau Guest

    Default

    being a freak of art nouveau and classic design i just can't accept raw design. Avant garde has evolved to an unacceptable state
    Quote Originally Posted by blackjack21trader
    Some examples of "industrial design" elements:


    Kitchen constructed of industrial materials.



    Industrial wire for the railings of staircase



    No walls to partition ! Just open spaces.


    2 levels in one floor



    Exposed pipes on ceilings.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    138

    Default

    Just read that 30 units launched was successfully sold by SC Global, very healthy take up,

  30. #30
    mr funny is offline Any complaints please PM me
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    8,129

    Default

    http://www.straitstimes.com/Money/St...ry_276671.html

    Sep 9, 2008 Tuesday

    30 units sold at Martin No. 38

    SC Global sells loft-style apartments at higher prices than expected

    By Joyce Teo, Property Correspondent


    DEVELOPERS will take heart from news that all 30 private preview units at SC Global's New York-style loft apartments in Martin Road have been sold at better-than-expected prices in the past fortnight.

    The company had said it was expecting around $2,000 per square foot for the project but sales came in at $1,881 psf to $2,494 psf, or an average of $2,130 psf.

    That would make the flats around $2 million to $3.8 million, depending on the size and location in the 15-storey freehold development called Martin No. 38.

    The firm announced yesterday that it defied expectations by selling about a third of the 91 units, with about 60 per cent of the buyers coming from overseas.

    An investment bank had recently forecast a take-up rate of slightly over half of the preview units.

    SC Global chairman and chief executive Simon Cheong told The Straits Times that the prices he achieved were clearly the highest in the area on a psf basis at this time. The prices also buck the trend, with sentiment in the property market still weak, particularly in the high-end sector.

    'These are 30 fellows buying in the midst of a storm. They must have seen a lot of value,' said Mr Cheong. 'To sell 30 units without an official launch, that has to do a lot with our branding.'

    A market watcher who declined to be named said there has been little change in prices of some other developments in the area, with a few even falling.

    Deals in the Robertson Quay area have been done at $1,130 to $1,840 psf this year although some Rivergate units sold for over $2,000 psf last year.

    'It's like a salmon swimming against the tide,' said Knight Frank director of research and consultancy Nicholas Mak, of the rarity of projects selling at 30 to 40 per cent above market like Martin No. 38, given today's gloomy sentiment.

    A market watcher noted that high pricing works in a bullish market but in the weak market prevailing now, sales are likely to slow after the first 20 or 30 per cent is sold.

    The developer says there is no need for an official launch as it has sold out its preview units. It has yet to decide on the launch of the second phase

    'In good and bad times, if your product is strong, you can still sell,' said Mr Cheong. 'We could have launched next year but as far as a public company is concerned, we try to phase our launches.

    'In good times, a lot of people can claim a lot of wonderful things... This is a time when you 'differentiate yourself'.'

    Martin No. 38 will feature high ceilings and seamless interior spaces, like the warehouse lofts in Lower Manhattan.

    It has mostly small units of 969 sq ft to 1,130 sq ft with a limited number of larger ones of 1,335 to 1,485 sq ft. There will also be four penthouses with pools.

    SC Global bought the site in 1999. It has said that it deferred development partly to wait for the surrounding environment to be ready.

    'Although we are a developer, we don't rush,' said Mr Cheong. 'The planning process took two to three years.'

    It also has a site in the Ardmore Park area and another leasehold site in Sentosa Cove. Both are in the design stage, said Mr Cheong.

    [email protected]

Similar Threads

  1. Martin Modern @ 35 Martin Place, Orchard
    By themostwanted in forum Marketplace
    Replies: 1
    -: 25-07-17, 22:37
  2. Replies: 459
    -: 30-12-13, 17:52
  3. SC Global to launch Martin No38
    By mr funny in forum Singapore Private Condominium Property Discussion and News
    Replies: 1
    -: 13-08-08, 10:30
  4. Hilltops (D9, Freehold, SC Global)
    By mr funny in forum District 9
    Replies: 3
    -: 20-03-07, 19:11
  5. 21 St Martin's Drive (D10, Freehold, SP Development)
    By Makelele in forum District 10
    Replies: 5
    -: 12-02-07, 22:16

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •