Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 53

Thread: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

  1. #1
    mr funny is offline Any complaints please PM me
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    8,129

    Default Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Published April 3, 2008

    Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    CDL chief suggests review of land sales, rethink on deferred payment scheme

    By KALPANA RASHIWALA


    (SINGAPORE) The uncertainty surrounding the local property market will last at least another six months and stakeholders must stay nimble to deal with the changing tides, says property tycoon Kwek Leng Beng.

    Speaking to BT, he said that the standstill in the local property market would end only after the US sub- prime crisis clears. 'I believe it will take another six months - if not more,' the executive chairman of listed City Developments Ltd (CDL) added.

    But any restoration of confidence in the property market will also hinge on stakeholders - in both the private and public sectors - remaining nimble and reviewing their strategies and policies to meet changing market conditions swiftly, Mr Kwek stressed in a recent interview with BT.

    'You have to cut your coat according to your cloth. As a developer, if I said last year that I was planning to launch five projects this year, but you know this year the market is quiet, it would be unwise for me to say 'because I decided last year to launch five projects this year, I must still go ahead'.'

    He urged the government to likewise review its current land sales programme. The programme was fixed last year, when the market was buoyant, compared to conditions today.

    The Government Land Sales Programme is announced every six months. The current H1 2008 slate of sites was announced early last December, which means that some of the decisions were probably made even earlier, property consultants say.

    'It's been proven in the past that the Singapore property market is a very important pillar that is closely linked to other markets - for example, financial markets, and the construction sector - and is in part driven by sentiment. So it's vital for stakeholders in the private and public sectors in the property industry to remain nimble. They can do this by reviewing and modifying their practices quickly to stay relevant. By doing this, we can minimise potential problems and address them ahead of time,' argues Mr Kwek, 68, who has about four decades of experience in the property business.

    He also advocates a free-market approach to policy at Singapore's current stage of development. 'As Singapore competes in the race among global cities, Singapore must not be perceived as a city that interferes unduly in market forces. We should instead allow market forces to prevail in the property market - unless the situation gets out of hand,' Mr Kwek says.

    He also says that the government may have been too quick to scrap the deferred payment scheme last October. Mr Kwek suggests the authorities should reconsider the scheme, which was started around 2002 to help stabilise the weak property buying sentiment at the time.

    Under the scheme, private property buyers could buy units in uncompleted developments with just a 10 or 20 per cent downpayment, with the payment for the rest of the purchase price in some cases postponed until the completion of the project. In contrast, under the normal progress payment scheme, buyers have to pay regular instalments to the developer, based on the stage of the project's construction.

    'If I am a developer and I want to offer deferred payment schemes to my home buyers, perhaps the developers' bankers may be in a better position to assess the viability of the scheme even whilst staying prudent. The assessment will take into account the project, as well as the developers behind the scheme,' Mr Kwek argues.

    Many analysts had blamed deferred payment for fuelling property speculation. Mr Kwek, while acknowledging this, argues that the scheme also served a useful function: it enabled buyers of new residential properties to dispose of their existing properties at a gradual pace, instead of being forced to sell them.

    The deferred payment scheme could be revived again - but this time with a higher initial payment of 30 per cent instead of 20 per cent, suggests Mr Kwek, who is also chairman and managing director of listed Hong Leong Finance.

    He praises the government's handling of the office crunch. The Urban Redevelopment Authority's introduction of transitional office sites - allowing temporary low-rise office blocks to be built quickly on 15-year leasehold sites - was a swift response to increase office supply for businesses that don't need to be in a posh CBD office block.

    'But a global city does not necessarily mean your office rentals have to be cheap. Tokyo, London, New York all have high rents but continue to attract businesses. What's just as important is that you have to create an environment where businesses can make money.

    'Don't forget, there are many cities fighting for investments. They can all copy Singapore. It's very easy to duplicate. So to get ahead of the pack, we have to think of something different - something that nobody has done. This boils down to being nimble,' Mr Kwek suggests.

  2. #2
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by mr funny
    Published April 3, 2008

    Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    CDL chief suggests review of land sales, rethink on deferred payment scheme

    By KALPANA RASHIWALA


    (SINGAPORE) The uncertainty surrounding the local property market will last at least another six months and stakeholders must stay nimble to deal with the changing tides, says property tycoon Kwek Leng Beng.

    Speaking to BT, he said that the standstill in the local property market would end only after the US sub- prime crisis clears. 'I believe it will take another six months - if not more,' the executive chairman of listed City Developments Ltd (CDL) added.

    But any restoration of confidence in the property market will also hinge on stakeholders - in both the private and public sectors - remaining nimble and reviewing their strategies and policies to meet changing market conditions swiftly, Mr Kwek stressed in a recent interview with BT.

    'You have to cut your coat according to your cloth. As a developer, if I said last year that I was planning to launch five projects this year, but you know this year the market is quiet, it would be unwise for me to say 'because I decided last year to launch five projects this year, I must still go ahead'.'

    He urged the government to likewise review its current land sales programme. The programme was fixed last year, when the market was buoyant, compared to conditions today.

    The Government Land Sales Programme is announced every six months. The current H1 2008 slate of sites was announced early last December, which means that some of the decisions were probably made even earlier, property consultants say.

    'It's been proven in the past that the Singapore property market is a very important pillar that is closely linked to other markets - for example, financial markets, and the construction sector - and is in part driven by sentiment. So it's vital for stakeholders in the private and public sectors in the property industry to remain nimble. They can do this by reviewing and modifying their practices quickly to stay relevant. By doing this, we can minimise potential problems and address them ahead of time,' argues Mr Kwek, 68, who has about four decades of experience in the property business.

    He also advocates a free-market approach to policy at Singapore's current stage of development. 'As Singapore competes in the race among global cities, Singapore must not be perceived as a city that interferes unduly in market forces. We should instead allow market forces to prevail in the property market - unless the situation gets out of hand,' Mr Kwek says.

    He also says that the government may have been too quick to scrap the deferred payment scheme last October. Mr Kwek suggests the authorities should reconsider the scheme, which was started around 2002 to help stabilise the weak property buying sentiment at the time.

    Under the scheme, private property buyers could buy units in uncompleted developments with just a 10 or 20 per cent downpayment, with the payment for the rest of the purchase price in some cases postponed until the completion of the project. In contrast, under the normal progress payment scheme, buyers have to pay regular instalments to the developer, based on the stage of the project's construction.

    'If I am a developer and I want to offer deferred payment schemes to my home buyers, perhaps the developers' bankers may be in a better position to assess the viability of the scheme even whilst staying prudent. The assessment will take into account the project, as well as the developers behind the scheme,' Mr Kwek argues.

    Many analysts had blamed deferred payment for fuelling property speculation. Mr Kwek, while acknowledging this, argues that the scheme also served a useful function: it enabled buyers of new residential properties to dispose of their existing properties at a gradual pace, instead of being forced to sell them.

    The deferred payment scheme could be revived again - but this time with a higher initial payment of 30 per cent instead of 20 per cent, suggests Mr Kwek, who is also chairman and managing director of listed Hong Leong Finance.

    He praises the government's handling of the office crunch. The Urban Redevelopment Authority's introduction of transitional office sites - allowing temporary low-rise office blocks to be built quickly on 15-year leasehold sites - was a swift response to increase office supply for businesses that don't need to be in a posh CBD office block.

    'But a global city does not necessarily mean your office rentals have to be cheap. Tokyo, London, New York all have high rents but continue to attract businesses. What's just as important is that you have to create an environment where businesses can make money.

    'Don't forget, there are many cities fighting for investments. They can all copy Singapore. It's very easy to duplicate. So to get ahead of the pack, we have to think of something different - something that nobody has done. This boils down to being nimble,' Mr Kwek suggests.
    MY IDOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  3. #3
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    KLB is going to bring people to 'Holland'.

  4. #4
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Mr Kwek has all my respect. He is the only few who dare to speak out for the sake of the public interest. I believe he means well and objectively depicts our ppty market situation.

  5. #5
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    KLB is going to bring people to 'Holland'.
    Which part of Holland? Holland Road or Holland Village?

  6. #6
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    Which part of Holland? Holland Road or Holland Village?
    Or The Netherlands?

  7. #7
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    Mr Kwek has all my respect. He is the only few who dare to speak out for the sake of the public interest. I believe he means well and objectively depicts our ppty market situation.
    Public interest ???

  8. #8
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    Mr Kwek has all my respect. He is the only few who dare to speak out for the sake of the public interest. I believe he means well and objectively depicts our ppty market situation.
    He got no choices, cos he is the Indian Chief in property circle. after SC say that many developers are taking cover now, it is his turn.

  9. #9
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    It is very true. Interference is bad. Wonder whether those foreign buyers caught by sudden measures in May 1996 dare to re-enter this market, when authority does not believe in a free market like what they did with measures again last year.

  10. #10
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    It is very true. Interference is bad. Wonder whether those foreign buyers caught by sudden measures in May 1996 dare to re-enter this market, when authority does not believe in a free market like what they did with measures again last year.
    Authority very red eye. see developers make money, disturb only. now good la. property slow, revenues collect also slow.

  11. #11
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    Authority very red eye. see developers make money, disturb only. now good la. property slow, revenues collect also slow.
    International investors now go to Hong Kong and boosting up market there. They must be mad to invest here when Authority intervene so that any price increase will be moderate. At best make 5 % pa. but in a downturn it is to each his own. They don't owe the little red dot a living, not even giving it a second look.

  12. #12
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    International investors now go to Hong Kong and boosting up market there. They must be mad to invest here when Authority intervene so that any price increase will be moderate. At best make 5 % pa. but in a downturn it is to each his own. They don't owe the little red dot a living, not even giving it a second look.
    Wah! Now the gap between Hong Kong and Singapore is getting bigger and bigger.

  13. #13
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Hong Kong has so much opportunities than Singapore. Its linkages to Macau and China will help to boost its potential.

  14. #14
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    International investors now go to Hong Kong and boosting up market there. They must be mad to invest here when Authority intervene so that any price increase will be moderate. At best make 5 % pa. but in a downturn it is to each his own. They don't owe the little red dot a living, not even giving it a second look.
    What living? Foreign money in property never gave us a living. They want to make money out of our land.

    Better for them to go and jack up prices elsewhere.

  15. #15
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by mr funny
    Mr Kwek stressed in a recent interview with BT.

    'You have to cut your coat according to your cloth. As a developer, if I said last year that I was planning to launch five projects this year, but you know this year the market is quiet, it would be unwise for me to say 'because I decided last year to launch five projects this year, I must still go ahead'.
    What it means is that Kwek Leng Beng is not going to launch as many projects this year.

    This means that the supply will be reduced, to match the reduced demand.

    This means that the market should be firm.

    Other developers are also doing the same thing. They are holding back their launches.

    Of course the sour grapes will say that the developers cannot hold back for long.

    Then I think you have greatly underestimated the developers' profits for the last two years.

    I just got the annual reports from City Developments, CapitaLand and Keppel Land, let me read to you ...

    Profit Before Income Tax

    City Developments 2007: $954,613,000 while for 2006: $692,278,000

    CapitaLand 2007: $3,420,493 while 2006: $1,486,133,000

    Keppel 2007: $988,736,000 while 2006: $263,408,000

    Why is City Development's profits so much less than CapitaLand's?

    The answer is here "The group (City Dev) has also not adopted the same approach to revaluing its properties as some of its competitors, which have reported huge revaluation gains. With these gains, its profit would have surged to $2.8 billion, it said."

    So with this very deep-pocketed developers on our side, do we need to worry about holding power?

    Looking at the other side, do the buyers have equal "withholding power"?

    ChannelNewsAsia reported on 27 February 2008

    Last year, Singapore saw over 63,000 new PRs, an 11-per-cent increase from 2006; and the city-state also welcomed more than 17,000 new citizens, a 30-per-cent jump.

    Every year we are getting 80,000 new immigrants. This is not counting those foreigner coming to work here on employment pass.

    These people cannot sleep on the streets so they have two choices. Either:

    1. Buy; or
    2. Rent.

    If they withhold from buying, then this is going to happen:

    Published March 27, 2008

    Residential rents seen rising further

    En bloc sales and population increase caused by influx of foreigners will continue to fuel demand, writes LEONARD TAY


    Does this title look familiar?

    Well, I copied it from this condosingapore forum. It's the title of one of the threads here.

    Then as rentals keep going up and up, the rental yield of properties (currently around 5%) will become more and more attractive compared to putting money in fixed deposits (1.5%).

    Then what will happen?

    Then people will start visiting their bankers and enquire about housing loans (now at only 3%).

    Then another 80,000 immigrants will come in next year ...

    Then the people continue to withhold buying ... (like holding their breath under water).

    Then rental yields will reach 6%. Then Bernanke in the USA will slash interest rates again to tackle the subprime problem and our fixed deposit rates drop to 0.5% and mortgage loans drop to 2%.

    Then what will happen?

    Then people will start visiting their bankers and enquire about housing loans ...

    Then yet another 80,000 immigrants will come in ...

  16. #16
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Oops!

    Correction ...

    CapitaLand 2007: $3,420,493,000 while 2006: $1,486,133,000

  17. #17
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Changing of rules...

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    International investors now go to Hong Kong and boosting up market there. They must be mad to invest here when Authority intervene so that any price increase will be moderate. At best make 5 % pa. but in a downturn it is to each his own. They don't owe the little red dot a living, not even giving it a second look.
    Hong Kong market need not depend on 'International' investors. The Mainland Chinese are the ones buying up the properties in HK. The reason for the continuous uptrend in price there is because supply is estimated to be outstripped by demand at ratio of 5:7. And the Mainland Chinese are targeting good class ares like the Peak and Mid Valley. This is reason enough for HK property prices to keep moving up and far outstripe Singapore property prices by comparison.

  18. #18
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Foreigners are holding up prices in Singapore

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    What living? Foreign money in property never gave us a living. They want to make money out of our land.

    Better for them to go and jack up prices elsewhere.
    If only detailed caveats from SISV Realink can be public info....everyone will be able to see that transactions has reduced drastically. It will also be transparently clear that Foreigners are the only ones that are still paying prices of july to september 2007 for their current transactions.

    One glaring example for latest transaction by Foreigner. Imagine $3,000 psf in Meyer Road for CDL's Aalto! In Meyer Road?! Good luck to you Mr Foreigner ;-D BTW, it is a Penthouse for $16+M!

    On the other hand, is there something they know about property market that we don't?

  19. #19
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    It is very true. Interference is bad. Wonder whether those foreign buyers caught by sudden measures in May 1996 dare to re-enter this market, when authority does not believe in a free market like what they did with measures again last year.

    Well the latest interference may not be so blatant......URA is late to release property transactions for Q1. You can be sure that some datas are being re-intepreted to show a glowing and healthy Singapore property market.

    Already the 1st salvo has been fired, 4.9% increase property price from Q4 2007 to Q1 2008. How to absorb this?

  20. #20
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    Oops!

    Correction ...

    CapitaLand 2007: $3,420,493,000 while 2006: $1,486,133,000
    cannot even copy and paste properly..

  21. #21
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    What it means is that Kwek Leng Beng is not going to launch as many projects this year.

    This means that the supply will be reduced, to match the reduced demand.

    This means that the market should be firm.

    Other developers are also doing the same thing. They are holding back their launches.

    Of course the sour grapes will say that the developers cannot hold back for long.

    Then I think you have greatly underestimated the developers' profits for the last two years.

    I just got the annual reports from City Developments, CapitaLand and Keppel Land, let me read to you ...

    Profit Before Income Tax

    City Developments 2007: $954,613,000 while for 2006: $692,278,000

    CapitaLand 2007: $3,420,493 while 2006: $1,486,133,000

    Keppel 2007: $988,736,000 while 2006: $263,408,000

    Why is City Development's profits so much less than CapitaLand's?

    The answer is here "The group (City Dev) has also not adopted the same approach to revaluing its properties as some of its competitors, which have reported huge revaluation gains. With these gains, its profit would have surged to $2.8 billion, it said."

    So with this very deep-pocketed developers on our side, do we need to worry about holding power?

    Looking at the other side, do the buyers have equal "withholding power"?

    ChannelNewsAsia reported on 27 February 2008

    Last year, Singapore saw over 63,000 new PRs, an 11-per-cent increase from 2006; and the city-state also welcomed more than 17,000 new citizens, a 30-per-cent jump.

    Every year we are getting 80,000 new immigrants. This is not counting those foreigner coming to work here on employment pass.

    These people cannot sleep on the streets so they have two choices. Either:

    1. Buy; or
    2. Rent.

    If they withhold from buying, then this is going to happen:

    Published March 27, 2008

    Residential rents seen rising further

    En bloc sales and population increase caused by influx of foreigners will continue to fuel demand, writes LEONARD TAY


    Does this title look familiar?

    Well, I copied it from this condosingapore forum. It's the title of one of the threads here.

    Then as rentals keep going up and up, the rental yield of properties (currently around 5%) will become more and more attractive compared to putting money in fixed deposits (1.5%).

    Then what will happen?

    Then people will start visiting their bankers and enquire about housing loans (now at only 3%).

    Then another 80,000 immigrants will come in next year ...

    Then the people continue to withhold buying ... (like holding their breath under water).

    Then rental yields will reach 6%. Then Bernanke in the USA will slash interest rates again to tackle the subprime problem and our fixed deposit rates drop to 0.5% and mortgage loans drop to 2%.

    Then what will happen?

    Then people will start visiting their bankers and enquire about housing loans ...

    Then yet another 80,000 immigrants will come in ...
    This idiot is here again to distort facts.
    Nobody asking u to explain KLB says. Readers here know how to interprut.
    A moron in making.................

  22. #22
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by mr funny
    Published April 3, 2008

    Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    CDL chief suggests review of land sales, rethink on deferred payment scheme

    By KALPANA RASHIWALA


    (SINGAPORE) The uncertainty surrounding the local property market will last at least another six months and stakeholders must stay nimble to deal with the changing tides, says property tycoon Kwek Leng Beng.

    Speaking to BT, he said that the standstill in the local property market would end only after the US sub- prime crisis clears. 'I believe it will take another six months - if not more,' the executive chairman of listed City Developments Ltd (CDL) added.

    But any restoration of confidence in the property market will also hinge on stakeholders - in both the private and public sectors - remaining nimble and reviewing their strategies and policies to meet changing market conditions swiftly, Mr Kwek stressed in a recent interview with BT.

    'You have to cut your coat according to your cloth. As a developer, if I said last year that I was planning to launch five projects this year, but you know this year the market is quiet, it would be unwise for me to say 'because I decided last year to launch five projects this year, I must still go ahead'.'

    He urged the government to likewise review its current land sales programme. The programme was fixed last year, when the market was buoyant, compared to conditions today.

    The Government Land Sales Programme is announced every six months. The current H1 2008 slate of sites was announced early last December, which means that some of the decisions were probably made even earlier, property consultants say.

    'It's been proven in the past that the Singapore property market is a very important pillar that is closely linked to other markets - for example, financial markets, and the construction sector - and is in part driven by sentiment. So it's vital for stakeholders in the private and public sectors in the property industry to remain nimble. They can do this by reviewing and modifying their practices quickly to stay relevant. By doing this, we can minimise potential problems and address them ahead of time,' argues Mr Kwek, 68, who has about four decades of experience in the property business.

    He also advocates a free-market approach to policy at Singapore's current stage of development. 'As Singapore competes in the race among global cities, Singapore must not be perceived as a city that interferes unduly in market forces. We should instead allow market forces to prevail in the property market - unless the situation gets out of hand,' Mr Kwek says.

    He also says that the government may have been too quick to scrap the deferred payment scheme last October. Mr Kwek suggests the authorities should reconsider the scheme, which was started around 2002 to help stabilise the weak property buying sentiment at the time.

    Under the scheme, private property buyers could buy units in uncompleted developments with just a 10 or 20 per cent downpayment, with the payment for the rest of the purchase price in some cases postponed until the completion of the project. In contrast, under the normal progress payment scheme, buyers have to pay regular instalments to the developer, based on the stage of the project's construction.

    'If I am a developer and I want to offer deferred payment schemes to my home buyers, perhaps the developers' bankers may be in a better position to assess the viability of the scheme even whilst staying prudent. The assessment will take into account the project, as well as the developers behind the scheme,' Mr Kwek argues.

    Many analysts had blamed deferred payment for fuelling property speculation. Mr Kwek, while acknowledging this, argues that the scheme also served a useful function: it enabled buyers of new residential properties to dispose of their existing properties at a gradual pace, instead of being forced to sell them.

    The deferred payment scheme could be revived again - but this time with a higher initial payment of 30 per cent instead of 20 per cent, suggests Mr Kwek, who is also chairman and managing director of listed Hong Leong Finance.

    He praises the government's handling of the office crunch. The Urban Redevelopment Authority's introduction of transitional office sites - allowing temporary low-rise office blocks to be built quickly on 15-year leasehold sites - was a swift response to increase office supply for businesses that don't need to be in a posh CBD office block.

    'But a global city does not necessarily mean your office rentals have to be cheap. Tokyo, London, New York all have high rents but continue to attract businesses. What's just as important is that you have to create an environment where businesses can make money.

    'Don't forget, there are many cities fighting for investments. They can all copy Singapore. It's very easy to duplicate. So to get ahead of the pack, we have to think of something different - something that nobody has done. This boils down to being nimble,' Mr Kwek suggests.


    well said & well done, KLB.
    If govt bow to the pressure to suppress property price, they will get even stronger voice from the people.
    So they only need to do the right thing for the good of spore, as long as spore progress superbly, other issue can be resolved
    If they give way to votes, then spore is gone case just a matter of time.

  23. #23
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    This idiot is here again to distort facts.
    Nobody asking u to explain KLB says. Readers here know how to interprut.
    A moron in making.................
    This idiot is here again to distort facts. Nobody asking u to comment on his posting. Readers here know how to interpret his posting.

  24. #24
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    cannot even copy and paste properly..
    Exactly! Only knows how to make money but dunno how to copy and paste. What a crap!

  25. #25
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    Exactly! Only knows how to make money but dunno how to copy and paste. What a crap!
    Make money then hire people to copy and paste can?

  26. #26
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    Exactly! Only knows how to make money but dunno how to copy and paste. What a crap!
    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    Make money then hire people to copy and paste can?
    True! Smart!

  27. #27
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    True! Smart!
    You sounds like Mr Kwek.

  28. #28
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    What living? Foreign money in property never gave us a living. They want to make money out of our land.

    Better for them to go and jack up prices elsewhere.
    Wah! How can say like that?
    We need them to fill up the job vancancy lah.

  29. #29
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    Wah! How can say like that?
    We need them to fill up the job vancancy lah.
    ... but they are buying up our assets ...

  30. #30
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Re: Leng Beng urges nimble feet in shifting landscape

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    ... but they are buying up our assets ...
    Good for us right?

Similar Threads

  1. Lian Beng buys $46.2m Leng Kee plot
    By reporter2 in forum HDB, EC, commercial and industrial property discussion
    Replies: 0
    -: 02-05-14, 23:40
  2. Kwek Leng Beng is my idol
    By phantom_opera in forum Coffeeshop Talk
    Replies: 0
    -: 08-10-12, 21:56
  3. So what does Mr Kwek Leng Beng thinks?
    By land118 in forum Coffeeshop Talk
    Replies: 5
    -: 14-08-11, 20:01
  4. Leng Beng's recipe for public housing
    By mr funny in forum HDB, EC, commercial and industrial property discussion
    Replies: 0
    -: 03-04-08, 14:47

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •