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Thread: Solar film for windows (residential)

  1. #1
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    Default Solar film for windows (residential)

    Any good brands that is highly recommended?

    Sun-X? Vkool? Huper Optik? 3M?

    I kind of like Huper Optik, but dont know the pricing. anyone got good deal to recommend? Thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by leesg123
    Any good brands that is highly recommended?

    Sun-X? Vkool? Huper Optik? 3M?

    I kind of like Huper Optik, but dont know the pricing. anyone got good deal to recommend? Thanks!
    Before u install, if it iS tinted, do get the mc approval first ..

    On the above type, I know vcool and 3m on the high side.......
    U need to compare the specification between the few..

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    High end solar film does not need to be so dark and yet still can cut off sUubstantial solar radiation.

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    For solar film to work effectively, you need to close the windows. It defeats the purpose of cooling the room. Better to get cheaper curtains.

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    Quote Originally Posted by leesg123
    Any good brands that is highly recommended?

    Sun-X? Vkool? Huper Optik? 3M?

    I kind of like Huper Optik, but dont know the pricing. anyone got good deal to recommend? Thanks!
    3M is $16/sqft. Go visit the showroom at Kim Chuan/Hougang Ave 3 and get some samples/brochures. Claimed that can cut temperature by up to 5 degree. Even if it doesnt reduce temp that much it should be still useful to reduce UV.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zzz1
    Before u install, if it iS tinted, do get the mc approval first ..

    On the above type, I know vcool and 3m on the high side.......
    U need to compare the specification between the few..
    Get the solar film consultant to come onsite to take a look, test by taping the films of various tints on the window and then go outside of the house to see if there's any visible change in color. If no change in color of the window then I think should be safe.

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    I recently installed the Geoshield brand (from USA). The IRIS70 allows 67% visible light transmission (you can check the other attributes on the website www.geoshieldusa.com). It is slightly green tinted but after installing, the tint is not that obvious (my window glass is already tinted to comply with the rest of the windows in the condo). The price was $10+ psf (mine was 180+ sf). This is the brand being installed in Volkswagen cars. I read about it on renotalk.com. The specifications were comparable to the 3M film of similar attributes (I wanted around 70% visible light transmission as I have good unblocked views from my windows). 10 year warranty. If any bubbles, discolouration etc they will come in and replace.

    http://www.geoshieldusa.com/solarfilms.html

    I am not affiliated. Just sharing my experience.

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    For comparison, the specifications of 3M Prestige 70:
    http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/mediawe...cQ2DcQcccccc--

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    If you have a lot of windows directly facing the west sun, film at the highest rating will have no practical effect. You also need thick black-out curtains.

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    I personally think that 3M is overpriced, they spend too much $$ in adv, but no harm to get a quote from them. This is their agent site.
    http://www.jestac.com.sg/?gclid=CMjD...FUsb6wodADkATw

    This one made in USA, "LLumar", can consider.
    http://www.windowcool.com/

    To block the heat, film is better than curtain, can lower the temp by at least 2-3 degree.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kanarazu
    Get the solar film consultant to come onsite to take a look, test by taping the films of various tints on the window and then go outside of the house to see if there's any visible change in color. If no change in color of the window then I think should be safe.
    Usually the more reflective , the more effective the films...

    Last time I did the same, consultant stick few on the glass but go ground floor can nt see clearly. Best is the get approval from mc , request for few types approval then can select later on..

    Contractor will most willing to do, Cos once gotten approval, they will have track record and especially for those newly top, Alot of residents may want to do and is a opportunity for them. In which u can leverage for better deal ...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wynyard
    I personally think that 3M is overpriced, they spend too much $$ in adv, but no harm to get a quote from them. This is their agent site.
    http://www.jestac.com.sg/?gclid=CMjD...FUsb6wodADkATw

    This one made in USA, "LLumar", can consider.
    http://www.windowcool.com/

    To block the heat, film is better than curtain, can lower the temp by at least 2-3 degree.
    I tried an experiment with 1 small west-facing window, Prestige 40 film covers half of it and the other half without film. The thermometers an inch away on both sides of the window records a difference of only 0.3-0.6 degree celsius. Any idea what else do I need to tweak in the experiment to get a fairer trial?

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    Quote Originally Posted by hyenergix
    For solar film to work effectively, you need to close the windows. It defeats the purpose of cooling the room. Better to get cheaper curtains.
    Yea... is a practical issue.. Close window and become hot unless on ac...

    What I do was to open the window partially to reflect the ray and use curtain (the backing is reflective type) to block ... At least still got air circulation ....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wynyard

    This one made in USA, "LLumar", can consider.
    http://www.windowcool.com/
    I am using this as i have west sun facing rooms. Their costs is lower than what 3M offers but quality wise not bad. They will send a sales guy to come down to your place with a few samples/catalogue for you to pick & choose with recommendations. Overall, quite a good experience.

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    Better check before installing the reflective ones.
    Quote Originally Posted by zzz1
    Usually the more reflective , the more effective the films...

    Last time I did the same, consultant stick few on the glass but go ground floor can nt see clearly. Best is the get approval from mc , request for few types approval then can select later on..

    Contractor will most willing to do, Cos once gotten approval, they will have track record and especially for those newly top, Alot of residents may want to do and is a opportunity for them. In which u can leverage for better deal ...

  16. #16
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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by bigbertha
    I am using this as i have west sun facing rooms. Their costs is lower than what 3M offers but quality wise not bad. They will send a sales guy to come down to your place with a few samples/catalogue for you to pick & choose with recommendations. Overall, quite a good experience.
    Do you think solar films help in reducing heat gain in rooms with west sun?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kanarazu
    Do you think solar films help in reducing heat gain in rooms with west sun?
    Definitely. But you should know that they have different grade and use for different "model" of solar films. You'll have to know what you want. For us, we got something that reflect most of the UV and one that have a "mirror" effect for privacy (as we are not facing any main roads, that's ok). heehee, of course, no hue the MA then ... act blur.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kanarazu
    I tried an experiment with 1 small west-facing window, Prestige 40 film covers half of it and the other half without film. The thermometers an inch away on both sides of the window records a difference of only 0.3-0.6 degree celsius. Any idea what else do I need to tweak in the experiment to get a fairer trial?
    If you have 2 west-facing rooms of similar size, cover all the west facing windows in one room with the film and leave the other room with no film.

    As long as you have some uncovered windows in the same room, this will dilute out the effect of the small area that you have covered with the film and the heat lowering effect will not be as great as expected.

    If you managed to get 0.5 degree reduction will partially covering a small window, I would think it is already a decent result. It will still translate to some savings on your energy bill.

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    Don't the outlook of the condo looks very messy?
    Quote Originally Posted by bigbertha
    Definitely. But you should know that they have different grade and use for different "model" of solar films. You'll have to know what you want. For us, we got something that reflect most of the UV and one that have a "mirror" effect for privacy (as we are not facing any main roads, that's ok). heehee, of course, no hue the MA then ... act blur.

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    Ubi Ave 2 has some solar film shops ... and they pasted the different films on their glass panels which is facing the main road with direct sun ray. Can make a visit there to feel the difference between the diff types of films.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DC33_2008
    Don't the outlook of the condo looks very messy?
    Small development with mine hiding in one corner but we choose one (and luck should have it) that they a color that "matches" the frame of the sliding windows. Overall, still okay lah ... no complains so far. Steady bro ...

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    May luck be with you
    Quote Originally Posted by bigbertha
    Small development with mine hiding in one corner but we choose one (and luck should have it) that they a color that "matches" the frame of the sliding windows. Overall, still okay lah ... no complains so far. Steady bro ...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kanarazu
    Do you think solar films help in reducing heat gain in rooms with west sun?
    Even the top of the range only reject around 50% of solar energy. I don't have direct west sun but one side is north-east/south-east (morning sun) and my kitchen and yard is north-west. You can feel the difference with the solar film. It is less hot. Combined with curtains, it should make a west facing room more bearable. Better than not having the film at all.

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    Thank you everyone for the input!! Arigato!

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    Quote Originally Posted by DC33_2008
    Better check before installing the reflective ones.
    yeap...did mine , mild reflective type, with the blessing from MC..

    Contractor provided some sample with specification....those very reflective, or very very high heat rejection rate, MC infomed better don wan... one reason is the outlook of the condo , and other reason is the reflection may shine into other resident unit....

    i buy the latter reason, same if other install those that like mirror type , high reflection , and shine into our hse, we also don like it right?

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    Quote Originally Posted by chiaberry
    If you have 2 west-facing rooms of similar size, cover all the west facing windows in one room with the film and leave the other room with no film.

    As long as you have some uncovered windows in the same room, this will dilute out the effect of the small area that you have covered with the film and the heat lowering effect will not be as great as expected.

    If you managed to get 0.5 degree reduction will partially covering a small window, I would think it is already a decent result. It will still translate to some savings on your energy bill.
    I left my house and was away for 7 hours, with windows closed and the blinds down to make the experiment more accurate. The temperature difference between a normal tinted window and one that is installed with 3M PR40 at 5pm SG time (equivalent to 4pm solar heat) was 2.5 degree celsius. This is point-blank measurement just 2cm away from the window, quite impressive.

  27. #27
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    You should be measuring not just the air temperature but the operative temperature which is an average of mean radiant temperature and air temperature. Most people sitting next to the window with afternoon sun is due to the radiant heat (temperature).
    Quote Originally Posted by Kanarazu
    I left my house and was away for 7 hours, with windows closed and the blinds down to make the experiment more accurate. The temperature difference between a normal tinted window and one that is installed with 3M PR40 at 5pm SG time (equivalent to 4pm solar heat) was 2.5 degree celsius. This is point-blank measurement just 2cm away from the window, quite impressive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kanarazu
    I left my house and was away for 7 hours, with windows closed and the blinds down to make the experiment more accurate. The temperature difference between a normal tinted window and one that is installed with 3M PR40 at 5pm SG time (equivalent to 4pm solar heat) was 2.5 degree celsius. This is point-blank measurement just 2cm away from the window, quite impressive.
    No doubt that tint can reduce the radiant heat. What matters more is the ambient air temperature because I won't be staying near the windows most of the time. From my experience with window tint for my car, they only work for at most 10 min under afternoon sun. Greenhouse effect takes over very fast if there is inadequate ventilation.

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    How long do these film last? I recalled my las home, the edge start peeling after 3-4 years. Anyone has such bad experience?

    I am asking as I am planning to tint my current window. Any inputs most appreciated 😊

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clim1688
    How long do these film last? I recalled my las home, the edge start peeling after 3-4 years. Anyone has such bad experience?

    I am asking as I am planning to tint my current window. Any inputs most appreciated 😊
    No idea. The 3M ones on my car windows still looking perfect after 6 years.

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